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dc.contributorKing, Ruth
dc.contributorNadasdi, Terry
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-13T19:01:39Z
dc.date.available2009-07-13T19:01:39Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.citationLanguage in Society; 23 (3) 355-365
dc.identifier.issn0047-4045
dc.identifier.urihttps://yorkspace-new.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/2704
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT --This study, drawing on data from a large sociolinguistic interview corpus for three Acadian communities of Atlantic Canada, concerns codeswitches involving verbs of opinion or belief (e.g. guess, think, imagine, believe) in French-English bilingual discourse. The codeswitch itself serves to underscore the speaker’s stance as to the truth of the proposition – and, in some cases, to indicate a degree of uncertainty not nuanced by corresponding French language forms. Variation in usage is related to intensity of language contact at the levels of the community and of the individual. (Codeswitching, discourse analysis, evidentiality, quantitative sociolinguistics, Canada, Acadian, French)*en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.subjectMinority Language Variation
dc.subjectFrench -- Atlantic Provinces
dc.subjectCode Switching
dc.titleThe expression of evidentiality in French-English bilingual discourse
dc.typeArticle


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